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How to create auto-containment rules in a Windows profile

Release Time
05/18/2020
Views
231 times
Category
profiles
Tags


What is an auto-containment rule?

  • Auto-containment rules let you define which applications can run on managed devices, and what privileges they are allowed.
     
  • Comodo Client Security (CCS) on a device consults these rules every time a program is opened.
     
  • Each rule consists of 3 basic elements:
     
    1. Action - choice of:
       
      • Run Virtually - The application is run inside the container, a highly secure environment that is isolated from the rest of the endpoint.
         
      • Run Restricted - The application has limited privileges, can access very few operating system resources and can only open 10 processes at a time.
         
      • Block - The application is not allowed to run at all.
         
      • Ignore - The application can run as normal outside the container.
         
    2. Target - The applications, file groups or folders that you want to monitor in the rule. You can also add filters to target files that meet certain conditions.
       
    3. Options - Choose the trust level of the files you picked in #2. You can also set limits on memory consumption, execution time, and log options.
       
  • This tutorial explains how to create auto-containment rules in a Windows profile.

Create an auto-containment rule

  • Login to  Comodo One / Dragon
     
  • Click 'Applications' > 'Endpoint Manager'
     
  • Click ‘Configuration Templates’ > ‘Profiles’
     
  • Open the Windows profile applied to your target devices
     
    • Open the 'Containment' tab

      OR
       
    • Click 'Add Profile Section' > 'Containment', if it hasn't yet been added:
       
  • Click the 'Rules' tab


 

  • Click 'Add Rule'
     

Follow these three steps to create your rule:

Step 1 – Choose the action

The 'Action', in combination with the restriction level in the 'Options' tab, determines the privileges of a contained application.


 

Choose one of the following actions:

  • Run Virtually - The application is run inside the container, a highly secure environment that is isolated from the rest of your computer.
     
  • Run Restricted - The application is allowed to access very few operating system resources. It is not allowed to execute more than 10 processes at a time and has very limited privileges. Some applications, like computer games, may not work properly under this setting.
     
  • Block - The application is not allowed to run at all.
     
  • Ignore- The application can run as normal outside the container.

Step 2 – Select rule targets and filters

  • The targets are the files/folders/groups that are covered by the rule.
     
  • You can filter a rule so it applies to a narrower sub-set of files.
     
    • For example, you can specify 'All executables' as the target, then add a filter so it only affects executables from the internet.
       
    • Another example is if you want to allow unknown files created by a specific user to run outside the container. You would create an 'Ignore' rule with 'All Applications' as the target, then add 'Files created by a specific user' as the filter.

Set target and filters

  • Click the 'Criteria' tab
     
  • Click 'Edit' at top-right:


 

  • Click ‘Browse’ to choose the file/folder/group you want to target with the rule.
     
  • Choose any filters you require from the list. Filters let you narrow the scope of the rule so it only catches files that meet certain conditions.
     
  • If you don’t want any filters then skip straight to step 3
     
  • Click ‘OK’

See the following links if you want help to select a target or add a filter:

Select the target

  • Click 'Type' drop-down to choose an application, file group, hash, or folder as your target
     
    • Files - Browse to a specific file.
       
    • File Groups - Apply the rule to predefined file groups.
       
      • A filegroup is a collection of files which (usually) share similar attributes and/or functionality. For example, the 'Executables' group is a list of file types that can run code on your computer.
         
      • You can view and manage file groups in 'Settings' > 'System Templates' > 'File Groups Variables'.
         
    • Folder -  Apply the rule to all files in a folder or drive
       
    • File Hash - Apply the rule to all files that have a specific SHA1 hash value.
       
      • A hash value is a large number that is generated by passing the file through a hashing algorithm. The number uniquely identifies the file, and it is extremely unlikely that two files will ever generate the same hash value. The benefit of using a file hash is that the rule will still work even if the file name changes.
         
      • Enter the SHA1 hash value of the target executable file in the 'Target' field.
         
    • Process Hash - Apply the rule to files whose processes have a specific SHA1 hash value. Please see the description above if required.
       
      • Enter the SHA1 hash value of the process created by the target file in the 'Target' field.

Configure filters

Filters let you narrow the scope of a rule. Once set, the rule will only apply if the target file meets the conditions you specify.

The available filters are:

Files created by a specific application

Apply the rule to a file based on its source application.

You can also specify the file rating of the source application. The rule will only contain a file if its parent app has a certain trust rating.

Specify the source application:

  • Click the 'Add' button in the 'File Created by applications' stripe.


 

  • Type - The target types are the same as explained above.
     
  • Reputation - Choose the file rating of the source you specified in the 'Type' drop-down:


 

  • Click 'OK' to save your settings
     
  • Repeat the process to add more source applications

Files created by a specific process

  • Applies the rules to files created by a particular parent process.
     
  • You can also specify:
     
    • The file rating of the source. The rule will only contain a file if its parent process has a certain trust rating.
       
    • The number of levels in the process chain that should be inspected.

Specify source processes

  • Click the 'Add' button in the 'File Created by Process(es)' stripe:


 

  • Type - See target types above for more details.
     
  • Reputation - Choose the file rating of the source you specified in the 'Type' drop-down:

  • Click 'OK'

The source process type will be added.
 

  • Limit number of parent processes in the process chain to' - Specify how far up the process tree CCS should check when inspecting the file's sources. 1 = will only check the file's parent process. 2 = will check the parent process and the grand-parent process, etc.
     
  • Repeat to add more source processes

Files created by specific users

  • Applies the rule to any files created by a certain user or user group.
     
  • Click the 'Add' button in the 'File Created by User(s)' bar.
     
  • Next, select the target user group:


 

  • Repeat the process to add more user groups

Files from specific sources

  • Applies the rule to files that were copied/downloaded from certain locations.
     
  • Click the 'Add' button in the 'File Origin(s)' bar.
     
  • Choose the source from the options:

 

  • Internet - The rule only applies to files downloaded from the internet.
     
  • Removable Media - The rule only applies to items copied from external devices. For example, from a USB drive, CD/DVD, or external storage.
     
  • Intranet - The rule only applies to items downloaded from the local network.

Repeat the process to add more sources

Files which have a specific trust rating

  • Applies the rule to files that have the trust rating you set.
     
  • Click the 'Select' button in the 'File Rating' stripe


 

  • You can choose from the following trust ratings:
     
    • Trusted - Applications that are safe to run. A file is trusted if:
       
      • The file is on the global whitelist of safe files
         
      • The file is signed by a vendor with 'Trusted' rating in CCS vendor List
         
      • The file was installed by a trusted installer
         
      • The file was given a trusted rating by an admin ('Settings' > 'Application Control')
         
    • Malicious - Malware files. These files are on the blacklist of known harmful files.
       
    • Unrecognized - Files that do not have a current trust rating. These files are not on the blacklist nor the whitelist, so are given an 'unknown' trust rating.

Set the file age as filter criteria

  • Applies the rule to files based on their created date, or their age.
     
  • Click the 'Select' button in the 'File age' stripe.


 

There are two ways to specify file age:

  • File Creation Date - Apply the rule to files created before or after a certain date.
     
  • File age - Apply the rule to files less than, or greater than, a certain number of days old.

Click 'OK' once you have selected your filters. All filters you added will be listed in the ‘Criteria’ tab:


 

Step 3 – Select the options

The next step is to choose additional options and restrictions on items contained by the rule.

  • Click the 'Options' tab.


 

The options available depend on the action chosen in step 1.

Here are the options for each action:

  • Ignore:
     
    • Log when this action is performed - A CCS containment log is created whenever this rule is triggered.
       
    • Don't apply the selected action to child processes - Child processes are those started by the target application.
       
      • This option is disabled by default, so the ignore rule also applies to child processes.
         
      • If enabled, the ignore rule does not apply to child processes. Each child process will be inspected individually and all relevant rules applied.
         
  • Run Restricted and Run Virtually:
     
    • Log when this action is performed – See above.
       
    • Set Restriction Level - The available restriction levels are:
       
      • Partially Limited - The application is allowed to access all operating system files and resources like the clipboard. Modification of protected files/registry keys is not allowed. Privileged operations like loading drivers or debugging other applications are also not allowed.
         
      • Limited - The application can only access selected operating system resources. The application is not allowed to execute more than 10 processes at a time and is run without admin privileges.
         
      • Restricted - The application is allowed to access even fewer operating system resources than the ‘Limited’ option. The application is not allowed to execute more than 10 processes at a time. Some applications, like computer games, may not work properly under this setting.
         
      • Untrusted - The application is not allowed to access any operating system resources and cannot execute more than 10 processes at a time. Some applications that require user interaction may not work properly under this setting.
         
    • Limit maximum memory consumption to - Specify how much RAM the application can use.
       
    • Limit program execution time to - The maximum time the program can run. The program is terminated after the specified length of time.
       
  • Block:
     
    • Log when this action is performed - See above.
       
    • Quarantine program - If checked, the blocked file will be automatically moved to quarantine on the device.
       

Click 'OK' to save your rule. Use the ‘On/Off’ switch to activate or deactivate the rule:


 

  • Repeat the process to add more rules
     
  • You can drag-and-drop the rules to re-prioritize them. Rules at the top of the table have a higher priority than those underneath. The setting in the rule nearer the top will prevail in the event of a conflict between rules.
     
  • You can edit or remove rules using the options at the right.